Jan 19, 2012

Chengdu: Panda Park Preview

Show us the pandas already

A preview of the panda park

Our first order of business in Chengdu was to visit the Chengdu Panda Base, just outside the city. And our hostel, conveniently, organized an 8-passenger van to take us there and back. Scheduled departure from the hostel was 7:20 am, which would get us there well in time for the mid-morning feeding, when the pandas were at their most active.

It’s possible I don’t have to tell you, but this was really early for us. We blundered downstairs, bleary-eyed at 7 am, which gave us enough time to run out to the convenience store for drinks. (Chengdu is modern enough to have a ton of 7-11-like stores, and, in fact, some actual 7-11s.) It was still dark out, and most of the city seemed to still be asleep. We got back to the hostel with time to spare.

And then, our driver was half an hour late. And then …

We had to stop for gas for what seemed like another half an hour. And then, we had to stop to get the tires pumped up. Which was a good thing, because then, we had to drive over the most pot-hole filled road for ages. Where were we going?!

Our confidence in our journey was not bolstered by the Panda Base parking lot, which looked like it had been neglected for nearly a decade. But when we finally entered the Base, we found a beautiful park. The staff wasn’t quite open for business yet, but our driver grabbed us some maps from the tourist center and sent us on our way.

The thing about travelling to temperate climates during the winter is that you often get the tourist spots all to yourselves. There was our little group of 8 and a few others from other hostels, but it felt like the park was completely ours. We spent about two hours wandering from panda habitat to panda habitat. Birthing time was in August, so we saw some rambunctious cubs, as well as some adolescents and adults. (Newborn pandas are kind of gross looking anyway.) They also had a small population of red pandas, an animal that seems to get the shaft, attention-wise.

The grounds themselves were gorgeous, especially in contrast with the overgrown and crumbling parking lot. Each habitat was spacious and well-cared-for, and the surrounding parkland was beautifully landscaped with fantastic trees and, of course, bamboo. (Fun fact: Because pandas eat so much bamboo, the plants grown on the almost 300-acre base are supplementary to the supply they truck in from the surrounding countryside.) Being that the base is a non-profit rescue organization, it was nice to see that most of the money goes back into giving the pandas a nice place to live. Check it out:

Walking out of the mist, and into the park
Look around the park with our photo album.