Feb 7, 2013

Winter break: Batu Ferringhi

Where the Rules of Acquisition are replaced by the Rules of Relaxation

The beautiful beach at Batu Ferringhi
I'm at the beach
Say hello to tropical Emily! She’s much more fun than indoors-coat-wearing Emily.

Batu Ferringhi is a rather touristy strip of beaches along Penang’s northern coast. It’s about a 40-minute ride outside of Georgetown. Our guidebook tried to sell us on some of the more out-of-the-way beach and fishing villages on the southwest of the island — Batu Ferringhi is all concrete and hotels, they said — but our normal daily life happens off the beaten path, so we felt pretty OK not being so hard core on our vacation. Taxi, take us to the Hard Rock Hotel!

Not to stay, sillies. After a brief perusal of the Hard Rock’s artifacts in the lobby — they had one of Ronnie Wood’s pre-fame basses, a jacket of Bon Jovi’s, and a guitar that was signed by all of the Red Hot Chili Peppers! — we cut through their passageway to the beach.

The water we were on is the Malacca Strait which, zoom out enough, is fed by the Indian Ocean. In fact, on the way out, Balan, our cab driver, pointed out some areas that were hit by 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami — a little establishment called the Tsunami Cafe now stands on one of those sites; I’m not really sure what to think of that. But, when there’s not a natural disaster occurring, the water is calm and the waves are small.

Having been raised on different coasts of the U.S., Peter and I have different ideas of what a good beach should be. But Batu Ferringhi, with its flat, smooth white sand, surrounded by jungle beauty and gorgeous mountains, fit the bill for both of us. Yeah, there are restaurants and hotels and bars that encroach on the waterline, but that only means there’s something to do. What, are we just going to sit in the sun? We’ll burn!

As we walked west to east, things progressively got busier. We took lunch at a small beach-side cafe that served Malay and western food. It wasn’t terrible, and they served beer in frosty mugs. A little further down the beach, we spotted a grass-roofed hut massage parlor. We joked that we should get massages. And then we decided we weren’t joking.

It’s pretty glorious to listen to the rustle of the seaside while someone eases out your aches and pains with aromatic oils.

Dotting the coast line all the way from west to east are boat guys, who will rent you any type of boating experience you want, from a ride out to Monkey Beach to a drag along on a banana boat. One of the most fun things for us to do, however, was to watch the parasailors land. They come in all fast for a landing kicking their little legs. It’s hilarious.