breakfast

Nov 26, 2012

Chongqing: Yangtze River International Youth Hostel

Back on the road

The Chongqing Yangtze River International Youth Hostel
Omelettes for breakfastOmelettes for breakfastRoom oneRoom two

For the last weekend of National Day, we decided to get out of town. Our 12-hour fly-by of Chongqing this summer left us wanting more, so we hopped on a bus for the 2 and a half journey east.

This time we went rogue, accommodation-wise, and opted for a hostel that was not in our guidebook: Yangtze River International Youth Hostel. It was located just at the tip of the center-city peninsula in a quaint, traditionally styled building.

It was also right underneath a brand new bridge that was being constructed. I guess we’re just drawn to that sort of thing. But each room came stocked with ear plugs to block out the noise.

The restaurant-bar area was cozy and funky, with a full menu of Chinese and western foods — as reasonably priced as anywhere else. They had a small outdoor area, which would have been lovelier minus the giant construction cranes, but it was a perfectly nice place to enjoy a drink or a meal. Our particular favorites were the homemade mint tea and the breakfast omelets, the latter of which attempted a Mexican flavor (with a vegetarian option!) via a Sichuan spice rack. Oh, and the french fries were pretty wonderful, too.

Our room the first night was small but cute. It was two levels, with a small sitting area and TV downstairs and the bed upstairs. We loved it … until suspicious scrabbling noises started up in the walls and ceiling, and continued until dawn. This was not ideal. Rat fear makes it pretty hard to sleep.

In the morning, we asked for a change of rooms. They moved us, no problem — and, to be honest, they didn’t seem all that surprised by our complaint. Our second room was just off a balcony that overlooked the river. Minus the giant mold patch on the ceiling, this room was pretty nice.

There’s a really charming hostel here, gone slightly to seed. Like, someone had really cared for this place many years ago, but didn’t have the money or the desire to do the upkeep. The staff is genuinely helpful and friendly — they gave us thorough and accurate directions to pretty much everywhere in the city. As it is, however, mice and mold are just too much for us to return (although, to be fair, they weren’t enough to make us leave).

Sep 2, 2012

Easy like Sunday morning

Your table is ready

Noodles for breakfast

This morning we woke up on the early side — early for us, anyway — and, after weeks of rain, the sun was shining. It was a morning that said: Go get brunch!

Of course, the nearest diner is thousands of miles away. But the noodle house is just down the block. And here in China, often breakfast is a spicy noodle soup. We got a prime table outside — there isn’t really an inside — and watched the Sunday strollers as the cook prepared my regular. (Peter had an apple.) The bodega next door to the noodle house has six coin-operated kiddie rides out front, and we watched the babies bounce up and down in their rocket ships and race cars. Returning students stopped to chat with us. And, the sun, oh, the sun!

The food may have been different, but it was exactly the meal we wanted.

Dec 5, 2011

Hong Kong: Breakfast in Victoria Park

Fruit and croissants in the sun

People lounging on the lawn in Victoria Park
Browse our album of Victoria Park photos.

Our hostel was right near Victoria Park, a lovely expanse of greenspace. Sunday morning, we grabbed some fruit and croissants (ah, bread products!) and had a breakfast picnic.

We weren’t the only people with this idea, of course, on such a sunny day. The park was packed. Women in headscarves were selling tarps for people to spread out on the lawn. People were careful to stick to the shade, and many groups sat under parasols. I’ve finally found a culture where tan isn’t cool! (This actually gets a little creepy when people tell me I’m pretty for being so pale.)

A little ways from where we ate, there was a shallow pool where people brought their motor boats to race one another. There were several older men who seemed quite serious about it. The pool was divided in two, with one section devoted to a more “just for fun” type of hobbyist. We joined the kids in their delight at watching the different little crafts whiz by.

Nov 20, 2011

Real western breakfast!

And Earl Grey tea

Breakfast

We’re having too much fun for blogging, but I promise a whole series of posts on our Hong Kong weekend. In the meantime, here’s the English breakfast we had this morning. Butter! Tea with milk! Baked beans! Salad!