cooking

Mar 15, 2019

Fish mint in Chinese cuisine ... at your own risk

Beware this stinky herb

Watch out for fish mint! More on YouTube.

Fish mint is a delicacy … but I don’t want it. Watch what happens when some shows up anyway. Also, I can speak Chinese on the phone!

Jul 30, 2014

In the kitchen with Jessi

Our first class is on their way

The girls in our kitchen
From left to right: Yi, Meichen and Jessi, preparing a feast in our kitchen.
Jessi made a fantastic Sichuan-style dinner
Our meal of pumpkin soup, egg and scallion, and mildly spicy pork with peppers.
Hanging out with the kidsHave some dumplings
Left: This was our first time entertaining so many people at the new apartment; we had to borrow dishes from next door. Right: Jessi and the mountain of dumplings we made.

“I think students are closer to there teachers here in China than they are in America,” I said.

Jessi agreed. It’s because they spend more time together, she told me, they’re more like family. She was, at the time, mincing up some pork for the dumplings she was making me. I was nominally helping, cleaning the chives, but really the bulk of the work fell on her.

Jessi had been my student in my first year of teaching. (She’s namechecked in this essay.) Overwhelmed by our new lives that year, Peter and I didn’t make too many real connections with our students, but Jessi and a few of her friends were wonderful exceptions. We’ve kept in loose touch since then, and this summer she’s come over a few times to cook for us — she’s quite accomplished at Sichuan cuisine.

Our first meal together was an absolute feast, and she brought with her Kevin, Meichen and Yi. It was great catching up with the kids. Kevin, whom we used to refer to as the Crane, was back from his training year in Singapore and is now pretty fluent in English. He starts university in Singapore in the fall, and we can tell he’s having an amazing adventure abroad. Meichen, one of Peter’s top students from his top class, has not waited to start her advanced education — she’s already taken an English course from online university Coursera. Meichen and Kevin talked books and translation with Peter for much of the evening. Yi is a new friend, and very shy — though she seemed to have fun. She did tell me that I taught her mother when I did that course at the local teacher’s college!

Jessi will be staying in Luzhou for school, attending the city’s Medical College. During one of our very first after-class chats she told me that she wanted to be a doctor, so I’m fantastically happy for her. Likewise, I’m happy for myself, because if she stays nearby, she can come over and make me more delicious dumplings.

Sep 15, 2013

Penang: Cooking at the Tropical Spice Garden

Pearly Kee schools us in Baba-Nyonya cuisine

A cooking lesson with Pearly Kee
The pond in the Tropical Spice GardenTaking some tea in the gardenPearly supervises Dad frying some chickenThe kitchen where we've workedOur soupPeter is cooking
Pearly is flexible with her recipes, so Peter was able to join in the fun with vegetarian versions of our dishes.

The cooking class at Batu Ferringhi’s Tropical Spice Garden opens with a thorough tour of the titular garden. The green space, which abuts actual jungle, is home to a wide variety of plants, many of them edible. The coolest part was the spices; seeing them in the wild and then smelling and even tasting them. The tour ended with tea time in a little tea time grotto, with a brew made from plants from the garden.

Then we met Pearly, an effervescent Penangite of Chinese heritage and our teacher for the morning. The class was made up of Peter and I, my parents, and Italians Andrea and his daughter Diana. Pearly walked us through the recipes for Inche Kabin and a curry mee soup, telling stories while we worked. She kept an eagle eye on us, jumping in quickly if things were about to go wrong; and her team of helpers performed our grunt work: clearing away our scraps, changing our washing bowls when the water got murky, keeping us supplied with beverages. As my mom commented, it was like learning to cook as if you were a princess.

But our meals turned out great. We brought them outside and ate lunch on the large patio. Pearly and her helpers kept the nutmeg juice (fantastic, BTW!) flowing while we ate. It was a great reward for all of our hard work.

Jan 5, 2013

Firing up the BBQ

Camping out, on our own back porch

Our new grill set up on the porch

At the old campus, we live next door to a camping supply store where we’ve spent a surprisingly large amount of time given that we’re not outdoor people. But, they have good travel backpacks and it is one of the few places that we can find big enough pants for Peter. It also doesn’t hurt that the people who work there are super nice.

When we found out that our new apartment was going to have a small porch, the first thing we thought was: we need to get a grill. Never mind that most people just use that space for hanging clothes to dry and storing broken appliances — we’ll show them the real American use for a porch.

Peter and the grillBBQ breadTiger Striped Peppers

And the camping store had a perfect little hibachi, that wasn’t too expensive, either. This was in the midst of our mad bus trips back and forth between the old and new apartments, when we were functioning as our own moving van, so we didn’t actually get the grill over to its proper place for a few weeks. Once we did, the obvious problem of charcoal finally stared us in the face. I realized that I had been assuming that we could just pick up a bag of Kingsford at the True Value or the A&P. But, WE DON’T HAVE A TRUE VALUE OR AN A&P! AND NO KINGSFORD!

We did search our supermarket, to no avail. Then, Peter had the bright idea to ask the camping store people where to buy our charcoal! Of course, they would know.

And they did. The trouble was communicating it through our language barriers. I could ask the question: 在哪里买木炭 [At where do you buy charcoal]? But unless the answer was pointing out a location visible from where we were, there was no way I could understand the answer — I realized way too late.

Fortunately, the woman working that afternoon had a friend with some pretty good English. As she translated for us, a crowd of people gathered, excited to see one of their own talking in English with the foreigners. But though we were speaking the same language, it was still too confusing (“How long is your camping trip?” “We just want to cook dinner!” “Yes, but for how many nights?!”) The eventual solution: The camping store woman would go buy us some charcoal, and we would pick it up from her the following week. How incredibly generous!

And it worked out! We picked up the coal, hauled it out to the new campus and have been grilling away for months. We’ve done flat breads, curried veggie scrambles, dry-rub tofu and much more. Peter has even been perfecting the Tiger Striped Hot Peppers that we were introduced to at BBQ Sticks. (It’s thanks to our Fuchsia Dunlop Sichuan cookbook that we were able to identify the dish; thanks Lizzy and Jesse!)

Teachers are still startled to look out and see us relaxing out in our clothes drying area, but we’re having a lot of fun.

Our grilled sandwich meal

Apr 22, 2012

Pizza party

So delicious

The final result

As I said in my last post, more food ingredients are coming into focus out of all of the visual clutter. I’m also getting much better at writing down characters from Google Translate and at guessing where a given product might be found (unlike with the plunger hunt). And that’s enabled us to recreate all kinds of non-Chinese food; we’ve done Mexican, Brazilian, Indian, Thai, American, Italian and random fusion of all sorts of cuisine.

Pizza in the wok

One thing we do really miss is pizza. They serve something called pizza at the Western Restaurants around town, but we have to be really desperate to go for that. But, over the past few months, cheese has shown up in a couple of the grocery stores. It’s mostly processed singles, but one grocery store has an analog of Laughing Cow cheese that, if we’re being generous (and we are!), has a texture like goat cheese. Tomatoes here are treated like a fruit — meaning ketchup, juice, et al. are on the sweet side — but the international sections of most bigger supermarkets carry recognizably Western tomato sauce. (Of course we could stew our own sauce in the rice cooker; that’s a goal for next time.) And, the last piece of our puzzle, using our translation notebook, we found yeast last weekend at the spice man’s stall at the farmer’s market.

And what does that all spell? PIZZA!

We used our good friend Martha’s recipe for pizza on the grill and just did it on the wok. As you can see above, we piled on the fresh vegetables, which were really good. The cheese behaved just as I had hoped it would, getting slightly crispy on the outside and ooey-gooey in the middle. We added some smokey tofu crumbles to one of the pizzas for a smokey-facon flavor (that was the best one). The crusts came out OK for my first time making them, though I think I’d like a little more practice before serving our homemade pizza to our Chinese friends.

It was pretty much a full day of work (not to mention all the ingredient hunting in the week before), but it was so worth it. Even with the not-perfect crust, the pizzas were delicious! It was also really satisfying to figure out how to make the impossible possible.