grilling

Jan 6, 2013

Pizza party II

Our first gathering in the new apartment

Serving the pizza

Tina and the girls wanted to come see us in our apartment so we invited them over during their free time one Sunday evening. Unbeknownst to them, we started planning the pizza party. There was a double motive there in that we wanted to show them our favorite American food … and we also suspected that they might lose track of time and miss out on their dinner, and we didn’t want to let them go unfed.

By this time, we had gotten to know the girls a lot better. Tina is the boss, the ringleader of the pack. It is on her say so that other girls talk to us and sit with us. But she wields her power generously. I’d say, next in command is Jane. Bookish and reserved, Jane has the best English, so if anyone is unsure of what they want to say, they run it by her first.

Sky is quite bold and confident. She dreams of international travel, especially to Paris, and has lots of good questions. Elaine is quiet and kind. Her manner is friendly and open, and I’d guess her to be the conciliator of the group.

Poor Helen couldn’t make it. The girl who is NOT a turkey had to study during our little get together. In fact, she’s often studying. Though she’s the same age as the other girls, there’s something of a tag-along little sister to her. She’s adorable and they clearly love her, despite the hard times they give her.

Pizza cooking on the grill
We picked up black olives on our last trip to Chongqing, and their existence made up a lot for the crummy Laughing Cow-style cheese that we’re stuck with.
The pizza party in full swing
Sky: I don’t think I can finish my last piece.
Jane: I can help you with that.

The girls arrived as the grill was getting hot; we were using our good friend Martha’s grilled pizza recipe again. They oohed and aahed over our new grill — “You know how to cook with this!?” — and were generally very impressed before the food even came out. We discussed BBQ culture in America, which they appreciated, though they were confused as to why summer is BBQ season. “You’re already hot,” they pointed out.

I was a little nervous serving them food, as I am still perfecting my bread making, but they really seemed to like it. They had never had pizza before, they told us. We beamed with pride, and I exempted myself from the fight for the last slices — which was really, really hard for me, but I did it!

A funny thing happened with our American pizza feast in that it evolved gracefully into a Chinese dinner party. As we waited for each batch to grill, the girls started to entertain us, singing American pop songs, telling jokes, and then performing a little traditional Chinese opera. Jane, in particular, was a lovely singer, demonstrating the technique singers use to vocally switch genders. “Where did you learn these songs?” we asked. “From TV,” they told us.

Too soon, they had to go back to class — yes on a Sunday evening, there is still more class. But after getting so much from them — they periodically give us little gifts and notes and cards in addition to friendship — it was nice to be able to give something to them. We’re buds for life.

Jan 5, 2013

Firing up the BBQ

Camping out, on our own back porch

Our new grill set up on the porch

At the old campus, we live next door to a camping supply store where we’ve spent a surprisingly large amount of time given that we’re not outdoor people. But, they have good travel backpacks and it is one of the few places that we can find big enough pants for Peter. It also doesn’t hurt that the people who work there are super nice.

When we found out that our new apartment was going to have a small porch, the first thing we thought was: we need to get a grill. Never mind that most people just use that space for hanging clothes to dry and storing broken appliances — we’ll show them the real American use for a porch.

Peter and the grillBBQ breadTiger Striped Peppers

And the camping store had a perfect little hibachi, that wasn’t too expensive, either. This was in the midst of our mad bus trips back and forth between the old and new apartments, when we were functioning as our own moving van, so we didn’t actually get the grill over to its proper place for a few weeks. Once we did, the obvious problem of charcoal finally stared us in the face. I realized that I had been assuming that we could just pick up a bag of Kingsford at the True Value or the A&P. But, WE DON’T HAVE A TRUE VALUE OR AN A&P! AND NO KINGSFORD!

We did search our supermarket, to no avail. Then, Peter had the bright idea to ask the camping store people where to buy our charcoal! Of course, they would know.

And they did. The trouble was communicating it through our language barriers. I could ask the question: 在哪里买木炭 [At where do you buy charcoal]? But unless the answer was pointing out a location visible from where we were, there was no way I could understand the answer — I realized way too late.

Fortunately, the woman working that afternoon had a friend with some pretty good English. As she translated for us, a crowd of people gathered, excited to see one of their own talking in English with the foreigners. But though we were speaking the same language, it was still too confusing (“How long is your camping trip?” “We just want to cook dinner!” “Yes, but for how many nights?!”) The eventual solution: The camping store woman would go buy us some charcoal, and we would pick it up from her the following week. How incredibly generous!

And it worked out! We picked up the coal, hauled it out to the new campus and have been grilling away for months. We’ve done flat breads, curried veggie scrambles, dry-rub tofu and much more. Peter has even been perfecting the Tiger Striped Hot Peppers that we were introduced to at BBQ Sticks. (It’s thanks to our Fuchsia Dunlop Sichuan cookbook that we were able to identify the dish; thanks Lizzy and Jesse!)

Teachers are still startled to look out and see us relaxing out in our clothes drying area, but we’re having a lot of fun.

Our grilled sandwich meal