Kuta Bali

Feb 2, 2013

Winter break: Eat this dessert

Cendol and Ais Kacang at Gurney Drive

The famous Gurney Drive is empty if you get there too early
I think we just got to the party way too early.

Gurney Drive is one of Penang’s big deal hawker centers, as sold to us by our guidebook, and we were curious to see how an internationally renowned food market differed from our comfy cafe at Kuta Bali.

It’s set up right on the water, so there are some beautiful views and nice breezes. In the early evening when we went, however, it was rather, shall we say, relaxed. Few vendors were open and there were only a couple of other tourists out and about, browsing the wares.

But we were hungry and hot, and we found an open cendol cart. Cendol is an icey dessert covered in coconut milk, palm sugar syrup, red beans and wormy green rice noodles. It’s not much to look at, but it tastes fantastic. Cool and refreshing, with just the right amount of sweetness.

Ais Kacang is another dish along those lines. It’s a pile of shaved ice, drizzled with syrups — one of them tasted like root beer! — and topped with sweet corn and condensed milk. Underneath this chilly mountain, there were surprise cubes of gelatin, dried currants and red beans. The whole thing (well, minus the gelatin, which is not my favorite) was fantastic.

Sadly, this was the only time and opportunity we had for Malaysian dessert. There was just too much food to eat and not enough appetite to finish it all. But on that hot afternoon, our sweet iceys really hit the spot.

We’ll just have to go back for more.

Eaten at: Gurney Drive hawker center, Georgetown

Jan 31, 2013

Winter break: Eat this nasi lemak

Nyonya chicken and salads over rice at Kuta Bali cafe

Eat this Nasi Lemak
Our nasi lemak lady didn’t have banana leaves, but she did have a banana leaf plate!

Let’s start with some definitions: Nyonya cuisine comes from the fusion of cultures between the 16th century male Chinese immigrants to Malaysia and the local women they married. Nasi is malay for rice. And nasi lemak is rice served with a bunch of tasty side dishes, sometimes wrapped in a banana leaf.

The woman serving nasi lemak at Kuta Bali was one of the few non-English speaking people that we had contact with on our trip, but her stall was set up buffet style, so with a smile and some pointing, there were no problems. (Except for the first night when we waved away her offer of rice — um, it’s in the name of the dish, dummies!)

The whole meal was homey and rich. The chicken was so tender that it practically melted off the drumstick; it was no problem to eat with the customary fork and spoon. It was slathered with a sweet and hearty curry. (Peter enjoyed the sauce on rice.)

Our various sides included green beans, cabbage slaw, pineapple and cucumber with chilis, some sort of greens slaw, spicy okra … All fantastic. Each came swimming in its own dressing that was perfect over the rice. Don’t say no to the rice.

Eaten at: Kuta Bali Cafe, Desa Permata.

Jan 29, 2013

Winter break: Eat this soup!

Spicy and sour Chinese soup at Kuta Bali Cafe

Spicy and Sour Soup

The first time we passed this stall, the man working it gave a soft pitch for his soups. “You can get it spicy or not spicy,” he told us. We were still in browse mode, so we kept going.

But, we came back after our initial sweep of all the food carts. And then again and again, after the first taste made this soup a Penang favorite.

The broth is sweet and tangy, and one of the spiciest things we had during our vacation (though not quite Sichuan spicy), and it’s filled with tender carrots and greens, as well as a protein of your choice: The beef was delicious, but the chicken was the winner, all melt-in-your-mouth moist. It also came with crab, which I’m sure was wonderful.

After picking it all out of the soup a couple of times, however, we eventually asked him to leave it out. Which he did, no problem, because the people we met were very accommodating even when our requests might have seemed wacko. (It’s an island! Eat the seafood, for goodness sake!)

The soup is served with a sweet garlicky vinaigrette that adds a nice chili pepper zing. Noodles are also an option, although we found that they took a little bit away from the soup’s already lovely simplicity.

Eaten at: Kuta Bali Cafe, Desa Permata.

Jan 28, 2013

Winter break: Hawker centers

Let the eating commence!

Hawkers by the Clan Jetties
Late lunch at a hawker center by the Clan Jetties
Kuta BaliKuta BaliKuta BaliKuta BaliNasi LemakBamboo chicken at Kuta BaliBamboo chicken at Kuta BaliPeter eating Nasi LemakFilled pancakeSome dumplings
Above: Just a small photographic taste of the delicious excitement of Kuta Bali Cafe.
Hong Kong Cafe was also nearby, but our heart belonged to Kuta Bali
Hong Kong Cafe was just a stone’s throw from Kuta Bali, but we pledged our allegiance early on.

In Penang, eating at its most basic and cheapest is done at hawker centers, collections of food carts assembled around a large dinning area where people gather late into the night. The mood is festive and lively — we’re eating, hooray! — and sometimes there’s karaoke or dancing. Despite it’s simplicity, It’s a place where a meal is an event.

In general, the food from these humble carts is cheap, but no less than absolutely delicious. It’s a point of pride for some of the hawkers that their cart and their dish has been in their family for generations. Every kind of cuisine is represented: Indian, Chinese, Malay … even western — though, to be honest, none of the western food looked all that enticing to us.

There are a few famous centers around Penang that are listed in all the guidebooks, but take a walk and you’ll find one. We had three good ones on our block alone. We came to be quite attached to the Kuta Bali Cafe, a large and lively dining hall just a short walk from our hostel. We ended up there pretty much every night, for a meal, a drink, a late-night snack, or just to get one more taste of that wonderful dish we tried the night before. Going from cart to cart every night, we soon had compiled a long list of favorites.

Emboldened by his discovery of the 牛肉面, Peter’s vegetarian strategy for this trip was to not worry about meatlessness, but instead look for dishes where the meat could be pushed to the side, or moved over to my plate. (I felt a little Jack Sprat and his wife on more than a couple occasions.) He found a couple of tasty treats this way, but even more amazingly, we found that we could actually ask the cooks to dish up their dish meat-free. Because they speak English in Penang! And understand vegetarianism! Peter even got a chicken pita sandwich, hold the chicken.

On average, our food costs would be between 10-20RM [or US$3-7] — the beers would add another 40RM [or about US$13] — which made eating this way very attractive. But it was also a super fun atmosphere. Sitting out in the clear tropical nights with a bucket of iced beers and plates piled high with our new favorite foods — you really can’t beat that. It’s like the best summer BBQ you’ve ever been to, catered by 50 chefs who are all experts in their cuisine. We were in heaven … and so were the locals, to whom this is an everyday experience.

We didn’t know exactly, when we set out, what we were looking for our of our Penang experience, but if all we did was eat a meal at Kuta Bali, that would have been enough.