tea

Apr 19, 2014

Return to Longan Forest

A walk in the (now finished) park

The longan forest park is very big and beautiful
A pavillion with a tea houseWedding photos
In China, wedding photos are a big, multi-day production and you can get them done anytime, any place, in many different costumes. The big white dress is not traditional here, but more and more popular as China looks to the west for style tips.

Early April in Luzhou is that sweet spot between the cold, rainy winter and the relentlessly sweltering summer — I guess you call that spring — so during that time, it’s priority for us to get out into that sweet, sweet sunshine as much as we can. This year’s Qingming Festival gave us a three-day weekend at the beginning of the month, and Peter and I (and hundreds of Luzhou families) took advantage of our holiday Monday to visit the Longan Forest Scenic Area, which is just a short walk from our countryside campus.

Our first visit to the park was more than a year ago, when it was still under construction. It’s finished now, and really pretty — all manicured greenery and delightful garden paths. It’s big, too. We spent hours walking the hilly grounds from end to end, and it was a 30 kuai cab ride back to our neighborhood afterwards. (Generally, a taxi from the city center out to the new school is half that.)

When the walking started to become more tiring than fun, we stopped at a tea house for a flowery cuppa. Now a stationary target, we attracted bunches of children who wanted to show off their English and parents who wanted to show their kids foreigners. It’s all part of the job.

Water everywhereA man-made waterfall

Jan 23, 2012

Chengdu: Renmin Park

Tea by the lake

We’ve got a large album of photos from Renmin Park right here.

Renmin Park — or, the People’s Park — is a large park close to the center of the city. Popular with locals and tourists alike, even on the cold January day that we were there, it was a bustling scene.

Where we entered the park, there was a pretty cool amusement park area called Kids’ Paradise. In our wanders, we also saw the lake where they were renting out paddle boats, several tea houses and a monument to the Railway Protection Movement. In every free corner, there were groups of people dancing, doing tai chi, watching live music performances or just watching the world go by.

We sat for a bit by the lake to enjoy some tea, which is served loose in small cups with a lid to keep it warm. It also comes with a thermos of hot water so that you can refill your cup as much as you like. Lingering is encouraged and expected.

While we were sitting, we were approached by a local man who has been running tours for foreigners for the past 22 years. His speciality is taking tourists “off the beaten path.” We chatted about what we do, where we’re from, etc., and he gave us some good suggestions of places to visit. He also tried to sell us tickets to the Sichuan Opera, but he was OK with it when we said no.

Jan 10, 2012

Crossing the river

Ferrying across the Yangtze

Get on a boat
Check out our album of photos from the Changjiang River.

So we’ve actually been on vacation for the past two weeks, and while we have some travel planned starting tomorrow, we’ve been taking this opportunity to explore our own city a little more.

Last week, we had a not-cold, not-rainy day, so we went out for a walk by the riverfront. We finally decided to try out one of those tea places that we always walk past. I pointed at some drinks on our food list, and we ended up with some hot sugar lemon water, which was actually much better than it sounds. As we sat, vendors wandered by, offering their services to the few patrons who were out that day. A very aggressive ear cleaner came by, but one of my life rules it to limit how many strangers I let stick pointy things into my ear, so we said no until he went away.

While we were sittin’ and sippin’, we noticed that one of the boats that we had mistaken for a restaurant was actually a ferry landing. “We should go across the river some afternoon,” Peter said. “How about this afternoon?” I said.

The boat was oooooold looking, but not unsafe. There was a basket full of life-preservers in the middle of the passenger area, and some people took them up. Not knowing the protocol, and wanting to err on the side of caution, we took some too. Once the boat got underway, it became clear that we didn’t really need them.

What a different scene on the other side! It was like we stepped back in time to what I imagine pre-’80s China might have looked like. The architecture was very utilitarian, and everything was a little bit crumbling. It was just dark, gray and concrete. As we walked further away from the river, the high-rises gave way to shorter buildings with storefronts on the bottom floor selling everything from salt (now that we know what we’re looking for, its everywhere!) to novelty socks to dish detergent.

I don’t think we’ll go back there, but it was interesting to see.

Nov 12, 2011

Tea time

Hanging out with new friends

Taking tea with Summer and Hank

The other night we went out for some tea with some of our new Chinese friends. From left, we have: Hank, Sugar, Peter, Me, Summer and Jenny.

We went to a place up by the Tuo River (the river farther from our house), overlooking Baizitu Square. It was really lovely. We got our own private room and ordered up some green tea, beer, a fruit plate, boiled peanuts and pistachios, and we talked a lot about the differences and similarities between China and America. (“Does everyone in America own their own field, house and car? Because we think they do.” Hank, via Jenny, asked.) We also traded some vocabulary: 花生 (huasheng) means peanut. Summer also told us how to ask, “Can you give me a discount?” But I’ve already forgotten it.

There was one little item on our fruit plate that they were curious to know the English name for. It was about the size of an extra large grape, with a small seed in the middle and an apple-like texture. But neither Peter nor I had ever seen anything like it. So Summer looked it up on her phone. Jujube. We both laughed when she showed us. Neither of us knew that a jujube was a real fruit. Summer asked how it was pronounced. “That’s so cute!” she said when we told her.