Thailand

Jul 5, 2016

Five years in China!

A video scrapbook

Five years in China from Uncle Foreigner on Vimeo.

In September, we will have been in China for five years!

When we first got on that plane, oh so long ago, we had no idea what to expect. But our time here has been filled with good friends, delicious food, wacky students, and exciting adventures. Enjoy this video scrapbook of our “DVD extras,” scenes from Luzhou, Lijiang, Chengdu, Vietnam, Thailand, and some of the smaller villages in and around those places.

Mar 1, 2016

Some nights in Bangkok

Eat the chicken

Jan 27, 2013

Winter break: Georgetown

The city

The Georgetown Heritage Area
Looking down on Georgetown, from the top floor of Komtar
Penang Road
Action on Penang Road
Khoo Kongsi
The ornate exterior of Khoo Kongsi
A drawing at Khoo Kongsi
A close-up of “Hundred Sons and Thousand Grandsons”
The Blue MansionOn the tour of the Blue Mansion
The tour of the Blue Mansion is very thorough.

Georgetown is where most Penang visitors stay if they’re not at the beach. It’s the state’s capital, and is situated on a little nose of land on the northeast corner of the island. The city was founded by Captain Francis Light in 1786 for the British East India Company, and is home to many fine examples of British colonial architecture.

Penang’s other cultures have left their architectural mark, as well, and there are beautiful Chinese temples and clan houses, Islamic mosques, etc. The city is just lousy with gorgeous buildings with a mix of styles and cultures not seen anywhere else in Southeast Asia. In honor of that fact it was made a UNESCO World Heritage site in 2008.

We felt we would be remiss if we didn’t at least check out some of the sights.

Khoo Kongsi and the Blue Mansion

Khoo Kongsi is a Chinese clanhouse that serves the family Khoo. It’s basically a big, ornately decorated temple with a small museum on the ground floor. There are some beautiful illustrations throughout the temple; my favorite is the one titled “Hundred Sons and Thousand Grandsons,” that being the wish for all Chinese families.

The Blue Mansion is exactly what it says, a big blue mansion built by a Chinese immigrant to Georgetown, Cheong Fatt Tze, in the 1880s. You have to join one of the three daily tours to see it, and I have to warn you, the tour is BRUTAL. We spent about 45 minutes of our 1 hour tour in the front vestibule while our guide summarized Cheong Fatt Tze’s life in excruciating detail. Her focus was largely on his money-making and saving, with a few details thrown in about the man himself and the construction of the house. Oh, and I’m forgetting, she also gave a pretty hard sell on staying in the mansion in its capacity as a hotel.

The interesting take away from these two attractions: They’ve both been stand ins for other countries in Hollywood movies. Khoo Kongsi was a makeshift Thailand in “Anna and the King” and the Blue Mansion stood for Vietnam in “Indochine,” when each production was barred from filming in their respective countries.

Somewhere in GeorgetownKomtar
Can you spot the Komtar?
At the Clan JettiesAt the Clan JettiesCity Hall

Komtar

Komtar isn’t a Heritage building, it’s a big mall and the tallest building in Georgetown. We took an elevator up to the top for some great views of the island. We also bought some jewelry at the bead store that, for whatever reason, was up in the viewing area.

The Clan Jetties

The waterfront on the south side of the city was settled mostly by Chinese families, and is still a Chinese neighborhood today. It’s a little weird to walk through people’s homes as a tourist attraction, but it makes for some nice photographs.

There are also some seafood restaurants out at the end of the piers, which would be pretty wonderful if you liked seafood. We don’t like seafood, but that’s on us, no fault of the jetties.

City Hall

We enjoyed looking at this colonial building without trying to tour it, mercifully. It’s very good looking.

Pretty much all of our efforts at cultural tourism were failures. The architecture in Georgetown is gorgeous, but the ways in which we tried for deeper engagement with it were just not that fulfilling. It was also way too hot to go tromping around the city just to look at things.

It took us a couple days to realize that we were just doing it wrong. The culture in Penang is not in institutions and museums (most of which were founded or renovated within the last 30-40 years, anyway). It’s the people, the natural beauty, and, not least importantly, the food. Eventually we calmed down and started having a lot more fun.

Don’t get all New York about it. The way to do Penang is to sit back and enjoy a good meal in the marvelous scenery.

Georgetown city Georgetown city