we finally found a good drink around here

Feb 19, 2013

Winter break: Eastern & Oriental Hotel

Cocktail hour(s) at Farquhar’s Bar

Peter, poolside
A martini at the barPeter, on the patio, looking like a boss
“Peter looks like a boss,” Young Jane said admiringly of this photo.

The E&O is touted as a fine example of colonial architecture in Georgetown, and, indeed, it’s a stunning white beauty. It was constructed in the 1880s, though the current incarnation of the business dates from 2001, when the hotel reopened after years of restoration work.

But we didn’t go there looking for history. We were looking for drinks.

Farquhar’s Bar, in the hotel lobby, is a dark wood paneled pub that looked almost too fancy for us the first time we walked in, but martinis must! We sat at the bar and watched the bartender go about his work meticulously. And the drinks he made us were amazing. By far the best martinis we’d have in Penang. Even better, one of the waitresses served us small bowls of cashews and delicious seasoned olives (also the best) while we waited.

Our tab came to about 100 ringgit, or US$30, which was a little pricey but still reasonable. Considering that our dinners were averaging less than 30 ringgit for the two of us, our budget could stand it. So, from that day on, Farquhar’s was our local. It became our regular evening ritual: Drinks on the bar’s poolside patio as we wound down from the day’s excitement. We eavesdropped on the other guests — all urbane sophisticates, many of them in their 70s and 80s — and made our plans for adventures to come. It was heaven

Looking at the blue horizon

Feb 2, 2012

Chengdu: Xiao Tong Alley

Where the hipsters are

Hanging out at a funky bar on Xiao Tong Alley
Here’s an album of photos from Xiao Tong Alley.

I’ll wrap up the story of our stay in Chengdu with a little bit about the area where our hostel was. (As I mentioned before, it was funky!)

We were on a street called Xiao Tong Alley (remember, “Xi” is pronounced “shə”), which we learned was a newish neighborhood that sprang up in the past year. It’s attracted a really young, vibrant, artsy crowd; I joked to Peter that we had found the Bushwick of China.

Whereas in the southern part of the city everything was huge and stark and modern and neon (the generally desired aesthetic of modernizing China), here everything was small-scale, home-made, rustic and, our favorite, artist-run. These places were decorated by someone who had an eye; we found edgy murals and distressed French-countryside chic - stark contrast to most of what we’d seen up to this point: the two dominant stylistic modes seem to be sidewalk roughness or super-sterile luxury. It was really cool to find “Alterna-hip.”

We spent a good chunk of each night somewhere on the street, and everywhere we went, we found someone who wanted to talk to us - and, importantly, who we wanted to talk to. From the bartender from Luzhou who was excited to jam out some Clash tunes with us, to the London-educated finance grad who now works with a bar-owning artists’ group, we mingled with some really interesting people who belong to the emerging creative class of China.

It was a Paris-in-the-’30s/Soho-in-the-’70s vibe that we weren’t sure that we’d find in China, but were supremely glad to do so.

Dec 20, 2011

Hong Kong: Out in Wan Chai

The wall of Scotch

Scotch at Nana's Thai restaurant

To finish up our last night in Hong Kong, we had a bar crawl through Wan Chai, one neighborhood over from the one where we were staying. Seedier spots mixed in with casual pubs and dive bars, and even on a Sunday there were a few people out and about.

Our first stop was Nana’s, a cute little Thai place that specialized in Scotch (pictured). We were a little sad that we had already eaten, because the food smelled so good. It was a funny place to find good Scotch - Nana’s was definitely pulling off a tropical beach shack vibe.

The next two destinations were English pubs: The Bulldog, which leaned toward sports bar, and Trafalgar Pub, also sporty but more refined with overstuffed chairs and dark woods.

At Trafalgar, where we were sitting on the balcony, it started to rain. It was late, and we were tired of spending money, so we called it a night. On the way home, we picked up a bag of pretzels (surprisingly hard to find over here) at the grocery store, and said our goodbyes to Hong Kong. The next morning, we would be picking up Peter’s passport and crossing the boarder back into China proper.

Scotch at Nana's
Check out our Wan Chai photo album.

Nov 29, 2011

Hong Kong: Pizza and Martinis

A decadant feast

Martinis!

On Saturday night, we found a lovely place that served pizza and martinis! In Luzhou, we can find neither. (Well, the Western restaurant has something they call pizza, but it isn’t. “You can call it a ham pie,” says Peter.) Spasso is actually located in a giant mall in Kowloon, but Ruby Tuesdays it isn’t. When we asked if they had olives and could they make us dirty martinis, our server asked us, “How dirty?” which was music to our ears; She knew there was a variable degree of dirtiness to a martini!

Pizza at Spasso
The pizza was not the best pizza, but it was very good pizza. It fit the bill for us. Also, It was quite nice to have some real wine. A night of indulgences was just want we needed! Or, wanted, I guess.
Look at the lights
This was the view from the patio. You’re looking back at Hong Kong Island.
We're actually here, in Hong Kong!
Here’s us, with our backs to the view. We had a lovely meal, Spasso. Thanks!