western food

Jul 22, 2018

A peanut butter taste of home

Who is the winner in the battle of the crunchies?

I ordered some peanut butter on Taobao, like you do. And then I ordered some more, and some more. And then what we had was a good old fashioned taste test!

If you’re interested in figuring out the relative nutritional information of each peanut butter — what a good math problem! — then you can find the stats below. (For the points, go comment on the video with your results!)


Skippy (per 2 Tbsp)

  • Source: America
  • Energy: 190 American Calories
  • Protein: 7g
  • Sugars: 3g


Whole Earth (per 100g)

  • Source: UK for Hong Kong Park N Shop
  • Energy: 643 kCal
  • Protein: 27.7g
  • Sugar: 3.8 g


Mother Earth (per 20g)

  • Source: New Zealand for Singapore
  • Energy: 518 kJ
  • Protein: 5.4g
  • Sugar: 1g

Feb 22, 2014

A beach vacation for non-beach people

Do we join Fish Club?

Real China and resort China intermingle in Sanya
Sanya is pretty touristy, but occasionally you get glimpses of the “real” China.
Outdoors at the Mandarin OrientalPeter and his dinner at the Mandarin Oriental
Outdoor dining at the Mandarin Oriental is a fabulous experience.
I get a late-night pizza at Surf CircusPeter at the bar at Surf Circus
The pizza at Surf Circus isn’t the greatest, but it is late-night satisfying.
Me with Sissi, the server at the Dolphin
My new friend Sissi, from the Dolphin
Out on the boardwalk, trying some fishThe real beer kegsThe house band at Baile Bar
Baile Bar, on the boardwalk, rocked nightly.
In the rose tub at the hot springsFish nibblers at the hot springs
The pools at Nantian Hot Springs are relaxing and fragrant. The pool on the right is filled with those fish that nibble on your dead skin!

Greater Sanya, as seen from a cab, is certainly still a part of the China we know and love, but the beachy areas exist solely on Planet Resort. We were there between the slight lull between the January 1 New Year and the start of Chinese New Year on January 30, so things were a bit sleepy, which is just the way we like it.

Beforehand, we had decided that the theme for the trip was: “Try the seafood, you might like it.” That lasted for a few days before we decided that we didn’t like it, and didn’t need to work so hard on our vacation. The one exception being the tasting menu during our fancy-pants night out at the Mandarin Oriental, where Peter described feeling like Little Lord Fauntleroy dining seaside on rock crab, turbot, red snapper and crème brûlée

Instead, we just relaxed. There are virtually no turkey sandwiches in China outside of this little strip of paradise, so we gave in to our western cravings and oscillated between burgers at the Dolphin Sports Bar & Grill and pizzas at beachfront bar Sanya Surf Circus. Sometimes — many times — we hit both places in the same night. By the end of the trip, I was on hugging terms with Dolphin waitress Sissi, whom we saw was beloved by most everybody in the place.

We watched a crop of new police recruits goof their way through a boardwalk inspection. (I’d totally watch a sitcom about beach cops.) We traded English and Chinese vocabulary with masseuses. We ate junky and satisfying beach food. We got way overcharged on coconuts, but bargained sharply for a cheap pair of flip flops.

We met Teana, the MO bartender, who spent a lovely evening talking with us and fixing up extravagant cocktails. She’s Sichuanese, and right away we bonded over love of hot pot. Her English was so good that I thought for sure she had studied abroad. Nope, she picked it up solely through hotel work. “I was nervous the first time I spoke with a foreigner,” she told us. But she made herself do it, over and over, and now she’s quite fluent.

We visited the Nantian Hot Springs, and spent a day hopping in and out of scalding pools of various flavors, steeping like tea and absorbing the supposed health benefits. Emboldened by Teana’s spirit, I powered through some challenging chats that I might have brushed off with an embarrassed, “I’m sorry. I don’t understand.”

Our 10 days lazed by gloriously, though it still felt like it was over in a snap. But that was OK. We were refreshed and restored by the sunshine in January. And ready to get back home.

More hot springsMore hot springsMore hot springsA regular swimming pool at the hot springs

Sep 28, 2013

Dali: Chilling in the old town

A backpacker’s paradise

Mom and dad found some friends and a sunflower field
In airport, on the way to DaliOur hostel, the Jade RooThe city walls of Dali old townIn the middle of the old townFresh vegetables outside of every restaurantA basic meal in the old townIt's not China without trafficSome buskersOn a bike ride outside the city

If you’re in Kunming, as everyone will tell you, you have to visit the nearby cities of Dali or Lijiang. Preferably both, but we didn’t have enough time; we only made it to Dali.

The city has a history as a backpacker’s haven from way back, for western and Chinese travellers alike, and its location in the mountains makes it an ideal starting point for hikers and campers. The Old Town — where we set up shop — is an ancient, walled-off collection of shops, restaurants, vendors and tourists a few blocks wide. (You can walk from end to end in about half an hour.)

You never forget that your in a touristy area, but the atmosphere is laid back and fun and international. Chinese kids busk along the streets, playing traditional tunes and western rock. Vendors sell stunning batiks and other handicrafts. Local ethnic restaurants are scattered throughout the area, as are coffee bars. There are also a few killer bakeries just along Renmin Lu. (Aside: Renmin Lu just means “The People’s Road.” There’s one in just about every Chinese city. In old Dali, Renmin Lu is where all the western restaurants and bars have set up shop these days. Don’t be fooled by “Foreigner’s Street,” which is one block over; if you’re looking for western, what you’re looking for is probably on Renmin Lu.)

Despite hosting so many temporary guests, the city is still friendly and welcoming. It’s also quite small. Picking up sandwiches one afternoon at Bakery 88, I met German owner Karine Kaffrell. We chatted a bit about living in China, and I had mentioned that I was here with my parents. “Oh yeah. I saw them!” she said, knowing, I don’t doubt, exactly who they were.

At Duan’s Kitchen, a chic Bai-style eatery that would have gotten a Times write up already if it was in Manhattan, the owner’s sister — English name Leah (“Like from ‘Star Wars’,” she told us) — went out of her way to give us a fantastic dinner. We didn’t have reservations and the restaurant was packed, so she kept the place open late, just to seat us, and planned us an off-menu meal that was beyond delicious. Tender plum beef, rich eggplant, asparagus and peach slices, a tofu and pork soup, and this superlative salad made with noodles of cheese. (Yup, you read that last bit right, cheese noodles.)

The Old Town has four city gates, one for each cardinal direction, and you can climb the city wall in some places to get an excellent view of the surrounding countryside. If you’re feeling the need to break out into that greenery — as my parents were — there are plenty of places to rent bikes and no shortage of people who will help you get where you want to go. On the road, my mom and dad teamed up with a few photography students from Chengdu who guided them around the sunflower fields and country roads. If you’re bike-averse, Peter and I can attest that there is some great scenery to be soaked while quaffing homebrewed beer at the Bad Monkey Bar. (You’ll want the outdoor seats, however, for maximum people-watching pleasure.)

We only had a few days, so we didn’t have time to check out new Dali city — a regular old modern metropolis, we hear, with some interesting sights. But Peter and I are already excited to go back.

Nothing but flowers