vegetarian option

Jul 29, 2013

Quality time with Melody

Meat and massage

Melody's in-home classroom full of students
At dinner with Melody's familySichuan vegetarian food
Vegetarian Peter’s meal at the beef restaurant

The first person to welcome us back to town was our friend Melody. We ran into her on the street two days in a row before nailing down dinner and massage plans for the third. Melody is passionate about teaching English and living the good life, and that’s why she’s an awesome friend for us!

We met her at her apartment, which is nice and big, and overlooks the river. From what she had told us before, we thought that she just home tutored a few students from time to time, but she actually has a small classroom that holds about 15-20 kids just off the living room. She was wrapping up a class as we arrived, and we played along as special guest stars, doing a live rendition of one of their textbook’s dialogues for them. Later, Peter told Melody that her students were so impressive and that she must be a very good teacher. She hesitated a moment before accepting the compliment — deflection is the usual mode in Chinese culture — and then smiled and giggled in pride.

Dinner was at a Chinese Muslim restaurant around the corner. Muslim restaurants in Luzhou are favored for their beef dishes, Sichuan cuisine being primarily pork based. She brought along her father, step-mother and step-brother, so that we could order more and varied dishes without being wasteful. It was really great. I especially liked the steak strips with pickled hot peppers. “Do you eat these?” I asked, pointing out a pepper. “You can,” said Melody, popping one in her mouth. I sniffed one and immediately choked, so I decided to skip ‘em.

After dinner, we went to a new (to us) massage place … around the corner from Sticks! The guys there said they’d seen us eating sticks many times. The story was that this massage place was opened by the masseur who had trained many of Luzhou’s other professionals. And they were fantastic. A good life indeed!

Feb 21, 2013

Winter break: Eat this nasi kandar

The best meal ever at Line Clear

Hello 8-bit Eating
Choose your meats
Line up hereThe foodLine ClearIt's just deliciousPeter, in his new shirt
Right before dinner, Peter bought this shirt at Sam’s Collection!
Fish headA bubbling pot

Anthony Bourdain told us to go to Penang, and Anthony Bourdain told us to go to Line Clear. And now I’m telling you: Go to Penang, and GO TO LINE CLEAR! It was by far the best meal of our trip, and possibly one of the best meals of our lives. But, I’m getting ahead of myself.

Line Clear is a Georgetown restaurant that specializes in nasi kandar. Nasi kandar is a famous Malay dish that consists of gravyed stuff over rice. Not too complicated. But, oh, what Line Clear does with that simple formula.

The restaurant is near Soho Free Pub on Jalan Penang. It’s tucked back down a deceptively quiet corridor that opens into a large open space. Metal picnic tables are lined up under a tin roof, and the food is stacked in large steam trays along one wall.

We weren’t really sure how to get the process started, but as we stood and stared hungrily at the piles and piles of food, two servers kindly rushed to our aid. One of the guys scooped a plate of biryani rice for me and pointed out the options: “Chicken, mutton, chicken, fish …” I went for a chicken and another chicken. He delivered two healthy portions, flooded the plate with extra sauce from other trays, and pointed me toward the check-out.

While this was going on, Peter was trying to explain to another server that he just wanted some vegetables and sauce on his rice, leave out the meat. There was a bit of a language barrier, but when Peter dropped the word “vegetarian,” all was understood. Our man whisked Peter over to another station full of vegetables and vegetable-based curry. No need to compromise on chicken stock, they have vegetarianism here!

Both of our meals were absolutely out of this world. My chicken was melt-off-the-bone succulent, and the two curries — one sweet and one spicy — melded together beautifully with the rest of the melanged sauces. Peter’s plate was just as flavorful and hearty, with large helpings of okra, potatoes, cabbage and dark leafies, covered in tomato- and eggplant-based sauces.

Line Clear doesn’t serve beer — it’s a Muslim shop — but we were pretty giddy on food alone. We raved to each other between bites, and wished there was more when we were done. We vowed then and there that this would not be our last trip to Penang. It was that good.

Tony truly steered us right.

Feb 8, 2013

Winter break: Eat this veggie burger

Modern Malay fusion at Cafe Leaf

Vegetarian food at Cafe Leaf
Vegetarian food at Cafe LeafCould veggie burgers be this good?
The Leaf’s vegetarian fare was fresh and flavorful.

We spotted this small cafe just north of Little India on our first jaunt through the neighborhood. Attracted by the window boxes growing fresh basil, mint and betel leaf we knew that we had to eat there.

Upon return, we found inside a cute little eatery, with a college town atmosphere. There were quotes pained on the wall about peace and sharing, and the space was open and bright. The menu was all vegetarian fusion, with a definite Malaysian influence.

We split a few dishes, like we do, to try to maximize our flavor per meal. The veggie burger: In my notes, I described it as “curried wonderfulness on a whole grain bun,” which is not the most helpful concrete description, but is a good indicator about how eating it made me feel.

We also went for the pasembor, a local style of mixed salad. Cafe Leaf’s was made with potato, jicama, peanuts and cucumbers with a crispy flake topper and a velvety tomato sauce. It was super light, with really subtle and delicate flavoring.

The noodle salad was made with fresh, whole wheat noodles and garnished with chopped lettuce, carrots, sesame seeds and some sort of nutlet, perhaps a sunflower seed. The whole thing was bathed in an airy, fantastic pumpkin sauce. Really, really delicious.

The iced coffee deserves special mention as well, only because we never get good coffee in China.

We were kind of on the late side for lunch, so by the time we tucked in, we were the only customers in the joint. Our server was a hip, younger girl, but there was also an older Chinese man hanging out with a chill-owner vibe. He looked up from his newspaper to ask us if we were from Europe. Almost no one pegs us for American here, because it’s just so far from Asia that we’re a much rarer commodity. It’s kind of fun to be special!

Eaten at: Cafe Leaf, Georgetown

Feb 6, 2013

Winter break: Eat this forkless

Banana leaf at Karai Kudi

The Banana Leaf setEat samosasEat with your hands

“Have you had banana leaf yet?” a cab driver asked us early on in our stay when we mentioned that we liked Indian food. We assured him that it was on our list, and on his word bumped it up several levels of importance. Always listen to the locals’ food suggestions.

According to our guidebook, Karaikudi in Little India had both banana leaf and air conditioning, so that was our destination. When we walked in, there was a group of tourists at a large table in the corner, but most of the clientele appeared to be Indian.

We puzzled over the extensive menu for a bit — “which one is banana leaf? None of them are called that!” — before a waiter came over to help. He directed us (without rolling his eyes) to what we were looking for, and explained that there were essentially two options: vegetarian or non-vegetarian. We ordered one and one. And some samosas for good measure.

Two large platters were brought to our table, each lined with — you got it! — a banana leaf and containing small tin cups of various sauces and curried things, with a heaping pile of rice in the center. You basically dump the cups on the rice, and scoop it up with your fingers. (There are forks, if you want to go that way.)

Guys, it was freaking amazing. Each sauce was delicious on its own, but they mingled in an alchemical way that took it to the moon! The chicken that came with the non-veger was juicy and tender and slathered in a fantastic brown curry. The non-veger also came with biryani rice as well as white — sorry Peter.

I don’t want to give short shrift to the samosas, either. Though they weren’t the main event, they were possibly the best samosas I’ve had in my life thus far. A thick and crispy fried outside surrounded beautifully soft potatoes inside, and they came with a squirty bottle of this tangy red sauce that was also quite lovely.

We came away from this meal pretty stuffed and happy. Later we learned that this style of food comes from South India, with Karaikudi specializing in Chettinadu cuisine. There, a free geography lesson for you, too.

Eaten at: Karaikudi restaurant, Little India, Georgetown

I'm eating with my handsOutside the restaurant

Jan 28, 2013

Winter break: Hawker centers

Let the eating commence!

Hawkers by the Clan Jetties
Late lunch at a hawker center by the Clan Jetties
Kuta BaliKuta BaliKuta BaliKuta BaliNasi LemakBamboo chicken at Kuta BaliBamboo chicken at Kuta BaliPeter eating Nasi LemakFilled pancakeSome dumplings
Above: Just a small photographic taste of the delicious excitement of Kuta Bali Cafe.
Hong Kong Cafe was also nearby, but our heart belonged to Kuta Bali
Hong Kong Cafe was just a stone’s throw from Kuta Bali, but we pledged our allegiance early on.

In Penang, eating at its most basic and cheapest is done at hawker centers, collections of food carts assembled around a large dinning area where people gather late into the night. The mood is festive and lively — we’re eating, hooray! — and sometimes there’s karaoke or dancing. Despite it’s simplicity, It’s a place where a meal is an event.

In general, the food from these humble carts is cheap, but no less than absolutely delicious. It’s a point of pride for some of the hawkers that their cart and their dish has been in their family for generations. Every kind of cuisine is represented: Indian, Chinese, Malay … even western — though, to be honest, none of the western food looked all that enticing to us.

There are a few famous centers around Penang that are listed in all the guidebooks, but take a walk and you’ll find one. We had three good ones on our block alone. We came to be quite attached to the Kuta Bali Cafe, a large and lively dining hall just a short walk from our hostel. We ended up there pretty much every night, for a meal, a drink, a late-night snack, or just to get one more taste of that wonderful dish we tried the night before. Going from cart to cart every night, we soon had compiled a long list of favorites.

Emboldened by his discovery of the 牛肉面, Peter’s vegetarian strategy for this trip was to not worry about meatlessness, but instead look for dishes where the meat could be pushed to the side, or moved over to my plate. (I felt a little Jack Sprat and his wife on more than a couple occasions.) He found a couple of tasty treats this way, but even more amazingly, we found that we could actually ask the cooks to dish up their dish meat-free. Because they speak English in Penang! And understand vegetarianism! Peter even got a chicken pita sandwich, hold the chicken.

On average, our food costs would be between 10-20RM [or US$3-7] — the beers would add another 40RM [or about US$13] — which made eating this way very attractive. But it was also a super fun atmosphere. Sitting out in the clear tropical nights with a bucket of iced beers and plates piled high with our new favorite foods — you really can’t beat that. It’s like the best summer BBQ you’ve ever been to, catered by 50 chefs who are all experts in their cuisine. We were in heaven … and so were the locals, to whom this is an everyday experience.

We didn’t know exactly, when we set out, what we were looking for our of our Penang experience, but if all we did was eat a meal at Kuta Bali, that would have been enough.

Dec 24, 2012

School lunch … and dinner

Digging into Chinese cafeteria food

A bird's eye view of the cafeteria

One of the easiest mealtime options when we’re at the new campus is the school cafeteria. Now, while school food in America is not the greatest, Chinese cafeteria food is actually pretty good. A meal here comprises steamed rice and two entrees — with plenty of vegetables — and a bowl of soup (which is the “drink” of the meal). We see the produce dropped off daily, and everything is fresh, fresh, fresh. Jamie Oliver, your advocacy is not needed here. We also see the food waste collected in giant vats after each meal and driven off somewhere — possibly for compost!

The cafeteria occupies an important position at the center of the campus and serves three meals a day. The student hall is three floors that center around a large spiral staircase. One wall of each floor is a bank of serving windows where an army of cafeteria workers dole out food from large steam trays. The kitchens are right behind these, and if you’re nosy, you can poke your head in and see mad chopping, stir frying and steaming going on. The teachers have a separate room in the back of the building — furnished with round tables and chairs rather than the fast food joint-style benches that the kids sit at.

The student food is quite basic; a chopped vegetable sometimes paired with a small amount chopped meat. Cauliflower and peppers, say, or pork and celery, or steamed winter melon, or carrots and mushy fish. Most of the students say that the food cooked for them at home is much better. But, at 4.70RMB [.75USD], it’s a tasty enough meal.

There’s also a meatless option which runs 2.70RMB, or, .43USD. For most of the kids, eating this way is just about saving money. There are a few students who actively follow a vegetarian diet, but vegetarianism as a concept is largely not understood in China. (Peter is often met with puzzlement and concern when he says that he doesn’t eat meat. “How will you stay strong and healthy?”) Choices can include zucchini, bok choi, pumpkin or shredded potatoes, but sometimes you’ll just end up with two servings of steamed cabbage.

This place serves a lot of kids

The teachers’ cafeteria steps it up quite a bit. First of, there’s more meat in each dish, and slightly better cuts. Also, the dishes are actual dishes, assembled with care and spices — Sichuan peppercorn features heavily — and there’s a piece of fruit for dessert. The meal is served on real plates and bowls, rather than cafeteria trays. Price tag: 6RMB [.96USD]

For all that, I only eat in the teachers’ caf if Peter takes a nap through lunch. Early on, we realized that the teachers aren’t really interested in making friends, but the students are. And lunch and dinner seemed like the perfect time to put ourselves out there for those kids who wanted to practice their English, learn about America, teach about China, etc. And, while the food is not as exciting, the atmosphere is much more friendly and boisterous. So, while many helpful adults have tried to point us in the “right” direction, most of the time we’re right there with the students, waiting on line for our plastic trays and parking it at a welded-to-the-table metal chair. It’s much more fun that way.

Meal oneMeal twoMeal three
Spicy pork with peppers, celery and cucumber, peppery cabbage, and egg and tomato soup
Pork with scallions and smoky tofu, zucchini, and a dishwater chicken soup
Savory pork and onions, with zucchini, spinach and pumpkin soup
Meal fourMeal fiveMeal six
Left: Zucchini, pasta, and cucumbers; Right: Winter melon and chicken, and cucumbers
Left: Onions, peppers, carrots and potato with pork slivers, and cabbage; Right: Carrots, and potatoes and chicken
Left: Cauliflower, and turnips (or some sort of root) and red peppers; Right: Pork and onions, and cauliflower

Nov 26, 2012

Chongqing: Yangtze River International Youth Hostel

Back on the road

The Chongqing Yangtze River International Youth Hostel
Omelettes for breakfastOmelettes for breakfastRoom oneRoom two

For the last weekend of National Day, we decided to get out of town. Our 12-hour fly-by of Chongqing this summer left us wanting more, so we hopped on a bus for the 2 and a half journey east.

This time we went rogue, accommodation-wise, and opted for a hostel that was not in our guidebook: Yangtze River International Youth Hostel. It was located just at the tip of the center-city peninsula in a quaint, traditionally styled building.

It was also right underneath a brand new bridge that was being constructed. I guess we’re just drawn to that sort of thing. But each room came stocked with ear plugs to block out the noise.

The restaurant-bar area was cozy and funky, with a full menu of Chinese and western foods — as reasonably priced as anywhere else. They had a small outdoor area, which would have been lovelier minus the giant construction cranes, but it was a perfectly nice place to enjoy a drink or a meal. Our particular favorites were the homemade mint tea and the breakfast omelets, the latter of which attempted a Mexican flavor (with a vegetarian option!) via a Sichuan spice rack. Oh, and the french fries were pretty wonderful, too.

Our room the first night was small but cute. It was two levels, with a small sitting area and TV downstairs and the bed upstairs. We loved it … until suspicious scrabbling noises started up in the walls and ceiling, and continued until dawn. This was not ideal. Rat fear makes it pretty hard to sleep.

In the morning, we asked for a change of rooms. They moved us, no problem — and, to be honest, they didn’t seem all that surprised by our complaint. Our second room was just off a balcony that overlooked the river. Minus the giant mold patch on the ceiling, this room was pretty nice.

There’s a really charming hostel here, gone slightly to seed. Like, someone had really cared for this place many years ago, but didn’t have the money or the desire to do the upkeep. The staff is genuinely helpful and friendly — they gave us thorough and accurate directions to pretty much everywhere in the city. As it is, however, mice and mold are just too much for us to return (although, to be fair, they weren’t enough to make us leave).