food

Apr 18, 2012

Beans, the magical fruit

Sometimes they’re sweet

These are the beans

Past the sixth month mark, we’re noticing a lot of new (to us) things popping up. It’s almost as if there’s so much to see that it has taken this long to take it all in. But something that’s recently come into focus is beans! We found some dried beans at the market a few weeks ago, and made some spicy bean dip with nachos made from fried wonton skins.

And then, last week, we went to get some takeout from the fried rice joint across the street from the school (it still tickles me to get Chinese takeout in China). I can muddle through our usual order OK, but some English-speaking students were helping us out and teaching me some new Chinese words. They got an order of the bean soup you see above, and it looked good, so we got an order too. Only to be surprised that it’s a sweet dessert not a savory entree!

Which, had we been paying attention, we should have suspected. We’ve had sweet bean cookies, sweet bean bread, why not sweet bean soup? It’s just, for a part of the world that does spicy so well - Sichuan cuisine (or Szechuan, if you like) is known around the world for its heat - how do they miss the fact that spicy beans are so delicious?!

Mar 22, 2012

6 months in China!

So let’s eat more sticks

Yesterday marked six months to the day we landed in China! We celebrated, of course, at sticks!

There are two things we’ve learned for sure: China is always loud, and we like our food spicy.

Feb 3, 2012

Dinner at sticks, now with video

It will definitely get loud

Dinner at Sticks from Uncle Foreigner on Vimeo.

Pretend you’re there with us and enjoy:

Jan 20, 2012

Chengdu: Taco Night at The Lazy Pug

With guacamole and cheese

Tacos and Nachos, Oh my!

In our research of Chengdu, a bar called The Lazy Pug kept coming up over and over as a popular hangout for Western ex-pats. That in itself wasn’t super enticing to us; we didn’t move to China to surround ourselves with other Americans. But. Thursday nights are Taco Night!

The bar is run by an American couple, and is pretty authentic in its Western-ness. It was easy to pretend that we were at home in New York while we were there - which isn’t something we want to do often, but every once in a while it’s comforting.

So, much like our visit to Hong Kong, this was a great place to assuage a little homesickness. Unlike our tacos in Hong Kong (which were good enough for being overseas), the Pug’s tacos were excellent. The meat was seasoned well and they understood what vegetarian meant, so both I and Peter were pleased. In fact, on our way out, we told the female half of the ownership couple that these were the most authentic tacos we’d had in this hemisphere. Her response was that she and her husband were taking a month off soon to travel and figure out how to make their own corn tortillas to make the tacos even better!

Jan 10, 2012

New food on sticks

Very similar to the old food on sticks

New sticks
Fish boat

Part of our explore-the-city mission is to find places to eat other than our beloved sticks pavilion. With that in mind, last week we got gussied up and went out.

Our intention was to finally hit up one of those boat restaurants we see along the river. Turns out - and we totally should have expected this — they are fish restaurants. You can even go pick out which fish you want. Unfortunately, we wanted zero fish, so we left. Strike one.

Looking for a rotating restaurant

But, we had heard about this rotating restaurant on the top of the Luzhou Hotel! So we went to search that out. When we found it, it looked like the whole building had been closed for quite a while. Strike two.

Fancy pants chain

Our next thought was to try this street near our house where we had seen several indoor eating establishments that looked cool. We picked one - and it was more food on sticks! It was a little more upscale than our favorite outdoor place - there were wooden benches instead of plastic stools and there was a wider selection of food. We got a bowl that was split in two, one side with super spicy broth and the other with a vegetable stock. It was a nice change of pace to have a similar meal with different flavors.

It was slightly more expensive than our usual place, but we’d definitely go back.

Dec 30, 2011

We found the salt

And a panda toaster

This is what salt looks like in Luzhou

Our search was reinvigorated when our friends came over to cook on Christmas and they were like, “Where’s your salt?” If it’s something that you expect to find in every apartment, we should be able to find it. So I finally did what I should have done three months ago, and looked up and wrote down the character for salt: 盐(yan).

I showed it to one of the women at the store, and she nodded her head and led us over to the racks and racks of MSG. She looked around, frowned and called someone else over. The second woman disappeared into a storage closet and emerged with a big box labelled “YAN.” Inside was our cute salty panda friend pictured above!

Now that we know what to look for, we see it everywhere, at markets big and small.

Also, you may notice that our bag of salt above is leaning against our new toaster. This was a Boxing Day buy (Christmas is a time for sales here). The surprise thing about our toaster is that it cooks a panda into the bread!

Panda toastMore panda toast

Dec 30, 2011

Dinner with our principals

Welcome to school

Our first banquet dinner

Last Friday night, or Christmas Eve eve, our head teachers Linda and Sarah took us for a long promised welcome dinner with our schools principals - we have one head principal and four vice principals. We went back to a restaurant that they had taken us to before: It’s hot pot, but everyone gets their own individual bowl of broth. I think because most Chinese dining is done family style, it’s a novelty to have your own portion.

We dressed nicely, to impress our bosses, but the rest of the night was not a staid, impress-your-bosses type of affair. There’s a manner here that we’re not sure is Chinese or local Sichuan, but people are very loud and forward. If you need more tea, you either yell for a waitress, or get up and get it yourself. Dropped your chopsticks? (Which I do often.) Go grab another pair from the waitress station. Even at upscale places, there’s a lot of yelling and getting up and grabbing. It’s brash and we like it.

But, anyway, ordering food is always a loud and confusing ordeal. Sarah did all the ordering for the table, but she and the waitress seemed to need to consult for a long time. In that time, the principals came in and were introduced to us. They had all been stuck at a meeting, so they were a little late, which they apologized profusely for. Each of them asked each of us for forgiveness, which was kind of astonishing and a little embarrassing - you’re the boss! Show up whenever you want!

After introductions, Sarah broke out the special bottle of Luzhou Laojiao that she had brought along, and the toasting began. Everyone was served a tiny thimble of the white liquor, and when someone toasted you, you stood up with them as they made their speech to you. The principals all could speak a little bit of English, but mostly Linda and Sarah translated. They wished us Merry Christmas and Happy New Year, and told us how happy they were to have us at their school. They were thrilled to have us as part of the family, they said. It was all very flattering. When the toast was finished, you drank your glass down to the bottom and held it out to show the other person that you had indeed drunk it all.

The spread

The food just kept coming. There were meat slices, leafy greens, sprouts and other veggies, mushrooms, bamboo shoots, potatoes, pumpkin, fish bits, dumplings and much, much more. The good thing for us about this meal is that you only take what you want, meaning we could skip the intestines, etc. Halfway through the meal they brought out some desserty items: fruit, sticky rice cakes and mini pumpkin muffins. (None of these went in the soup.) This did not mean the meal was done, however. More main course stuff followed. As did ice cream. And then more leafy greens. When we thought we were done, the question was posed to the table: rice or noodles to finish the meal? All of our hosts were pretty drunk by then (the Chinese really do metabolize alcohol much differently than we do), so the discussion was a hilarious one (they were all laughing about it, anyway), with one of the VPs chanting “mian, mian, mian!” Somehow, the decision was put to me. I chose noodles, of course.

The jokes were flying around the table, though even translated they didn’t always make sense to us — I have a whole post about Chinese humor to come, but from what I’ve seen it involves making a statement that is obviously false and then laughing your head off. As they had more to drink, there was less and less of an effort to translate things into English, but it was kind of interesting to sit back and watch the room descend into silliness.

When the meal was over, it was over. Everyone abruptly stood and gathered their coats and things. There was no lingering, no talk of an afterparty. The meal was done, it was time to go home. Everyone said their goodbyes and wished us Merry Christmas again as they bundled us off into a cab.

We may not have understood the whole night, but it was a fun time anyway. We feel so lucky to be at a school where everyone loves having us here. We’ve heard stories that that isn’t always the case — foreigner teachers can be resented, ignored, cheated, etc. But everyone from the students to our fellow teachers to our bosses has been incredibly nice and generous with their time and help and attention. I’d say, as winter break approaches, it’s going quite well.

Dec 20, 2011

Hong Kong: The search for Mexican food

Spoiler: We find some

Our need for pizza sated, the mission Sunday night was Mexican food. We looked up a few places in Central that sounded good.

An awesome thing about Central district: It’s situated on a super steep hill, so they’ve built a giant 800-meter long escalator. There’s a break every block, so you can get off and on where you need to. It’s super cool.

The Mexican place we found was called something like El Taco Loco, and it was just the kind of disgusting cheese-covered junk food we were looking for. It was a super casual place, with tacos and burritos served in red plastic baskets, and it seemed to be super popular with the younger ex-pat crowd.

After eating, we hit up an English-style pub called Waterloo Station. Basically, we wanted to suck up all the foreign-ness that we could before we returned to China.

We found some terrible Mexican food!
Follow the full journey to find Mexican food.

Dec 7, 2011

Translation fun

Eat up, bacon face

The noodle menu
I can’t read this!

I’ve been eating lunch pretty much every day at the noodle stand down the road from the school. It’s worked like this: The first day I went I asked for mian (“noodles, please!”) and the woman behind the counter said a bunch of stuff in Chinese that I just said yes to. I ended up with a delicious bowl of spicy noodle soup. The word has spread among the staff that this is what I eat, so I just walk in and someone brings me that same dish.

It’s a pretty convenient system, but I’ve been noticing other diners with other dishes I would like to try. One day, I tried pointing at a different dish that someone else was eating, but they smiled, nodded and served me the same thing I always have. So the solution I hit on was to take a picture of the menu (pictured, ha!) and I’ve been working on translating it at home.

In case you didn’t know, Chinese is hard, man! Some characters have a few different translations depending on context - like for example, that character at the end of each menu item (面), that’s mian, which means “noodle.” But it also can mean “surface” or “face,” which is how I ended up with a translation of “dirty burning surface” for one of the dishes. And I spent about an hour trying to figure out what “Wang surface blood broth” really might be. (I’m 80% sure it features pig intestine.)

Another dish came up as “blanket noodle.” But, as it turns out, it’s a wide, flat noodle that resembles a blanket, so it’s actually supposed to be called that.

My favorite mistranslated dish: “bacon face.”

Dec 5, 2011

Hong Kong: Breakfast in Victoria Park

Fruit and croissants in the sun

People lounging on the lawn in Victoria Park
Browse our album of Victoria Park photos.

Our hostel was right near Victoria Park, a lovely expanse of greenspace. Sunday morning, we grabbed some fruit and croissants (ah, bread products!) and had a breakfast picnic.

We weren’t the only people with this idea, of course, on such a sunny day. The park was packed. Women in headscarves were selling tarps for people to spread out on the lawn. People were careful to stick to the shade, and many groups sat under parasols. I’ve finally found a culture where tan isn’t cool! (This actually gets a little creepy when people tell me I’m pretty for being so pale.)

A little ways from where we ate, there was a shallow pool where people brought their motor boats to race one another. There were several older men who seemed quite serious about it. The pool was divided in two, with one section devoted to a more “just for fun” type of hobbyist. We joined the kids in their delight at watching the different little crafts whiz by.