Jalan Penang

Feb 21, 2013

Winter break: Eat this nasi kandar

The best meal ever at Line Clear

Hello 8-bit Eating
Choose your meats
Line up hereThe foodLine ClearIt's just deliciousPeter, in his new shirt
Right before dinner, Peter bought this shirt at Sam’s Collection!
Fish headA bubbling pot

Anthony Bourdain told us to go to Penang, and Anthony Bourdain told us to go to Line Clear. And now I’m telling you: Go to Penang, and GO TO LINE CLEAR! It was by far the best meal of our trip, and possibly one of the best meals of our lives. But, I’m getting ahead of myself.

Line Clear is a Georgetown restaurant that specializes in nasi kandar. Nasi kandar is a famous Malay dish that consists of gravyed stuff over rice. Not too complicated. But, oh, what Line Clear does with that simple formula.

The restaurant is near Soho Free Pub on Jalan Penang. It’s tucked back down a deceptively quiet corridor that opens into a large open space. Metal picnic tables are lined up under a tin roof, and the food is stacked in large steam trays along one wall.

We weren’t really sure how to get the process started, but as we stood and stared hungrily at the piles and piles of food, two servers kindly rushed to our aid. One of the guys scooped a plate of biryani rice for me and pointed out the options: “Chicken, mutton, chicken, fish …” I went for a chicken and another chicken. He delivered two healthy portions, flooded the plate with extra sauce from other trays, and pointed me toward the check-out.

While this was going on, Peter was trying to explain to another server that he just wanted some vegetables and sauce on his rice, leave out the meat. There was a bit of a language barrier, but when Peter dropped the word “vegetarian,” all was understood. Our man whisked Peter over to another station full of vegetables and vegetable-based curry. No need to compromise on chicken stock, they have vegetarianism here!

Both of our meals were absolutely out of this world. My chicken was melt-off-the-bone succulent, and the two curries — one sweet and one spicy — melded together beautifully with the rest of the melanged sauces. Peter’s plate was just as flavorful and hearty, with large helpings of okra, potatoes, cabbage and dark leafies, covered in tomato- and eggplant-based sauces.

Line Clear doesn’t serve beer — it’s a Muslim shop — but we were pretty giddy on food alone. We raved to each other between bites, and wished there was more when we were done. We vowed then and there that this would not be our last trip to Penang. It was that good.

Tony truly steered us right.

Feb 20, 2013

Winter Break: Georgetown bar crawl

Boozin’ along Jalan Penang

Visiting the Argylle
Margarita time
Peter magically doubled our margaritas at D’Joint.
Slippery Senioritas
Slippery Señoritas doesn’t actually have tapas, but they do serve the best mojitos.

Some nights, a refined round of cocktails at the Eastern & Oriental was an end unto itself, but other times it was the prelude to future parties down busy Jalan Penang, a bar-lined thoroughfare just south of the hotel. Whether you’re looking for shots on fire or a cold quiet beer, you can find it there.

The northernmost bit of the street, just a short stumble from the E&O, is a pedestrianized home to a bunch of cheesey tourist bars that WANT YOUR BUSINESS. Touts sit out in front of each bar, throwing enticing deals at anyone who walks by. The competition is fierce. We chose D’Joint, ‘cause they had 2-for-1 cocktails. They were as good as you’d expect 2-for-1 cocktails to be.

Across the street from that passel of pubs is “tapas bar” Slippery Señoritas. To be honest, it looks like the kind of place where people go to party ‘til they puke! There was a sign on the wall reading “Platform dancing: For ladies only,” and the lights and music were both flashy and loud.

But! They make a damn fine mojito; potent and with plenty of mint. Go on the early side, and you’ll have the whole place to yourself.

A ways down Jalan Penang sits the far calmer Soho Free House. They have “more draft beers than any bar in Malaysia.” Four draft beers, to be precise: Guinness, Kilkenny, Strongbow and Heineken.

I quickly got over my initial disappointment that they weren’t the 100-tap craft beer paradise I was unrealistically expecting. Draft Guinness is still delicious, and I was happy to have it. The atmosphere was chill, and the people were friendly. What more are you after?

We went back a few days after our initial visit and met Dan, a local of Chinese descent, who struck up a conversation with us about the beaded bracelet that Peter was wearing. Buddhists wear beads like that, he told us, because “they remind you not to get into mischief.” From there, our discussion meandered from reincarnation to local history to international travel. Typical pint talk, and bar buddies for an afternoon.

Still further south, there’s Cafe Argyll, another simple pub, but with a full menu of Indian food. The cocktails were much better than D’Joint’s, and the curries we sampled were amazing. After having only snacks our first time there, we made time to return for a full dinner later in our stay. Delicious.

Soho Free House
Why would you even want more than four kinds of beer?

Feb 17, 2013

Winter break: Let’s go to the mall!

And the boutiques, and the street markets, and the grocery store …

The Rainforest Cafe has great bagels
The Chocolate ShopThe night market

The triforce that creates the perfect Penang vacation, we read in our pre-trip research, is made up of eating, beaching and shopping. Check, check and … meh. Neither Peter nor I are big shoppers, but two out of three would be perfect enough for us. We’d leave the shopping to everyone else.

Or so we thought.

Our first trip to the mall was out of necessity: I needed a new bathing suit. But once that was out of the way … we kept on shopping.

The malls of Penang are big and modern. They’ve got all the familiar chains — The Gap, Crabtree & Evelyn, ESPRIT, Subway, Carrefour (and its not a vacation without a visit to Carrefour’s import section) — and, importantly, air conditioning. They’re also a good place to find massage chairs and junk food; We ended up using them as giant rest stops when Georgetown’s streets got a little too intense.

But these big boxes of international commerce are the least the island has to offer. We basically tripped over shopping experiences everywhere we went. Upscale boutiques to rink-a-dink flea markets. Our spoils from our spree included handmade jewelry, a Daredevil-shaped USB flash drive, T-shirts galore, bagels(!) and cheesy-cute sunglasses. And what fun we had acquiring them!

The coolest — and maybe most stereotypically touristy — transaction was at an Indian clothing store called Sam’s Collection. They offered beautiful men’s and women’s clothing in cotton, linen and silk. The lovely patterned fabrics, some with intricate embroidery, were the height of southeast Asian traveler chic.

Malaysia has a bargaining culture, just like China does, and at Sam’s I decided to try my skills — partially motivated by the fact that I didn’t want to go back to the ATM. Peter had some RMB in his wallet and they liked that, so we ended up making a deal in two currencies. How cool are we! As we paid up, an onlooking clerk threw a “Nice haggle!” our way. I felt pretty boss.

Sam's Collection